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2 months and craving like mad!

10 posts, 0 answered
  1. ocean
    ocean avatar
    264 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    16 Mar 2018
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    2 months and craving like mad, I just had to use my handy-dandy Nic spray for the first time since the first month and I'm hoping for a fast fix from it.  It been hard in the evenings since I cut down on the Patch and if it doesn't improve I may have to up my dose again.  I missed my Nic otine Addiction treatment today s I'll have to reschedule, its only once monthly.  My cravings are manageable during the day hours but peak during the evenings.  I've been off work this week on holidays and I don't like it, not enough work to divert my attention.  Is anyone out there in this predicament after 2 or 3 months???  I need inspiration!  And I need to see how my body is contuing to heal, all of the charts jump from 1 month to a year, I need to see the constant in between improvements for motivation.  I'm in a slump.  Thank You, Ocean.
  2. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    786 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    17 Mar 2018
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    Hi Ocean,

    I am sorry to hear you are still craving so bad.  That's awful.  I found that there were times in the first few months when I had intense cravings, but they didn't last terribly long and they certainly didn't happen every day.  And I think they were triggered by memories of how I used to smoke when I felt a certain way.

    I don't know what to suggest to you other than up your patch if it will help.   Remember, using NRTs is way better than smoking.

    I know what you mean about the literature going from 1 month to 6 months or 1 year or more.  I used to find that so frustrating.  So I just used to refer to my list of reasons for quitting, and I could rejoice knowing that the things that were bothering me about smoking were no longer disrupting my life.

    Try to do things that will make you happy, Ocean, because the happier you are, the easier it is to keep the quit. 
  3. chartippybum
    chartippybum avatar
    69 posts
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    21 Mar 2018
    26 Mar 2018
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    Thats great advice. I am only on month one. 
    I am happy my breathing is getting better it really bothered me to be out of breath doing any little task. I think i can google some information on how the body heals itsself after the first few months. There are also apps that count the number of cigerettes you havent smoke the days youve gained and the amount of tar you havent consumed and the money youve saved. If you can download an app like that they are good. I find they are a trigger for me though i dont know why i just find myself checking it all the time and it makes me want to celebrate i guess...but its up to you. Keep inspired. Keep motivated. And keep going!!!
  4. eagerquit
    eagerquit avatar
    410 posts
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    07 Mar 2018
    27 Mar 2018
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    It is a sheer pleasure to take a deep breath and get clean fresh air into my lungs without a wheeze or a cough.

    Eagerquit
  5. aurora
    aurora avatar
    61 posts
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    08 Mar 2018
    31 Mar 2018
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    hi Ocean,
    I'm almost one month quit. two nights ago I dreamt about smoking two cigarettes - then realized in my dream that it was a mistake and that I was quitting.
    I have had a few nights of really wanting to smoke, and it is usually at night.  What I have done is drink water, take deep breaths, and divert or distract myself.

    Even reading these posts I can feel myself getting a little stirred up - I have been struggling lately with emotions - particularly anxiety and anger.  I wonder about that part of the addiction - what it did for me in terms of keeping stuff contained.  I'm finding that hard these days.

    I have also heard the book by Allen Carr is good.  I'm thinking of trying to understand more about my feelings and thoughts about quitting at this point.  Even though I feel good physically, I don't want the feelings to take me out. I don't think going back to smoking is going to make me a happier person

  6. bobtoronto
    bobtoronto avatar
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    25 Jan 2018
    08 Apr 2018
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    I'm enjoying this thread very much. It really speaks to me and what I am going through right now. I'm Just a little over two months now and it is hell. I wish I could be more positive about it but it has frankly just been a living nightmare. The cravings have been far worse than the first month. I can attribute some of this to getting off the patch far too soon and maybe still feeling the affects of that. Also, right about the time of my first 30 days, I got hit with a nasty painful bursitis in my shoulder. I've missed a lot of work and have been cooped up in the apartment. Life has become something of a s***t storm. I keep trying to tell myself that smoking won't help any of this but the cravings remain abstinent. I'm also prone to anxiety and depression and I guess I'm finding out that smoking may have helped mask those feelings more than I realized. All I can say is HELP!!! Of all the times in my life I've disappointed myself, and I'm not a young man so I've disappointed myself on a number of occasions, if I pick up a smoke again, I think that will be the biggest personal disappointment IN MY LIFE bar none.
  7. marianne, quit coach
    marianne, quit coach avatar
    278 posts
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    30 Nov 2017
    08 Apr 2018
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    Hello Ocean and Bobtoronto,

    Thank you for expressing your challenge with cravings after 2 months of your quit since others feel the same.  We can certainly empathize with your slump and discouragement.  They say after the 3 month milestone, there is more relief with cravings since mentally you have had more time to change up habits and old patterns have had time to be replaced.  May I ask what your typical evening looks like Ocean?  And Bobtoronto, feeling such pain can make you more anxious and down.  

    Treepeo shared that focusing on what brings you joy will uplift you, motivating you to keep going.  Chartippybum, Eagerquit and Aurora find deep breathing has such benefits + other strategies of course.  

    Continue to remind yourself how far you have come and know there is always a way to cope.  Do you find having something to look forward to gives you hope?  Are you rewarding yourself in some way? Hard work is important to be acknowledged.  

    We are here for you and let us know how your day to day is going.  

    Thinking of you both.  Believe things will get better.  It has happened for others before you so know it will be just the same for you.  

    Marianne
  8. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    786 posts
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    09 Apr 2018
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    Hi bobtoronto,

    I can really relate to what you are saying.  I absolutely hate going through cravings.  There were times when my cravings were so bad that I thought I would lose my mind.  But I persevered, because like you, it was extremely important to me to quit smoking for good.  So I held on for dear life, and kept fighting.

    It sounds like you are going through a really rough patch, what with your bursitis (ouch) and being cooped up.  Both of those things make it even more difficult for you.  But hang in there, regardless.  You are always going to face challenges in life, and part of the process of quitting is learning how to deal with challenges without resorting to smoking.  

    And let's face it.  You have worked extremely hard to get to this point of being 2 months smoke free.  Don't let all that hard work and commitment be in vain.  You are going to hit a turning point soon, I just know it.  So stick to NOPE, not one puff ever, and the days will pass.  And then the cravings will ease off.  

    You are stronger than your addiction, bobtoronto.  I hope you are proud of what you have accomplished.  Keep fighting, it will change your life.
  9. ocean
    ocean avatar
    264 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    14 Apr 2018
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    Hi BobToronto, 
    I just saw this old post now.  I've had bursitis in my sholder for the past 8 weeks too, lol.  We have a lot in common.  It's so hard to fall asleep with all of the pressure on it at night.  Well, the good news is that I had my final meltdown about a week ago.  I'll be three months in 2 days and I really feel like I'm turning a corner for the better.  I joined the walk/run to quit and the exercise really helps with burning off stress.  And I feel light-headed and relaxed afterwards.  I'm so happy to have the horrible winter months behind us.  So exercise, no matter how minimal is working for me.  So long as I get my heart rate up for 25 minutes, I'm releived.  And then just putting in three months of feeling out this quit, adapting, and working through it helps.  I'll have many hard days to come, but I'm having many good days in a row now so I can't wait till you feel some relief soon.  And call a quit coach, buckle down on supports for those hard days, and most of all try and beleive that you're doing this for just 24 hours.  Anytime i get ahead of myself, even thinking now how I'm amost three months, I have to get back in my present and think one day at a time.  I also enjoy the immediate pleasures of more money, this has carried me through so many times!  Good luck!
  10. skystream
    skystream avatar
    10 posts
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    27 Apr 2018
    04 May 2018
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    Ocean's suggestion of focusing just on today . . . . . or, just the next 24 hours, is an excellent strategy.  I used that strategy when I quit drinking alcohol - another addiction which ruled my life for years!  It's a whole lot easier to think "just for today" vs. "this has to be forever".  Anticipating a 'forever' of craving-battles is a lot more daunting than a 24 hr battle.  As each 24 hours passes, you learn that you can hold out for 24 hours, and you get more confident and relaxed about the next 24 hrs.  One day . . . . . you realize that there are no longer daily cravings - so the issue of 'forever' is no longer an issue.  The sneaky cravings that pop up after that are a lot easier to cope with.  ( Mind you, having done both twice before, I have found that quitting alcohol is a whole lot easier than quitting smoking).  I am hoping that what I experienced in dealing with alcohol cravings will help me prepare for and deal with the cravings I expect to experience after I smoke my last cigarette (quit date May 31st, 2018) !!!  Hang in there toronto - "this too will pass."
10 posts, 0 answered