Forums / Cravings / Having a Tough Time Tonight

Having a Tough Time Tonight

8 posts, 0 answered
  1. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    832 posts
    Registered:
    29 Nov 2017
    19 Nov 2018
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    I haven't had a craving in about 5 months.  But tonight, BAM, I am having a doozy.  It hit me completely out of the blue.  I have no idea what caused it.  I am not stressed, and was just doing the dishes when I got "that feeling".  My lungs started that familiar throbbing and I said, "Whoa, what brought that on?"  Thankfully, I have learned that we can never be complacent.  And right now I am trying to push the craving into the background while I focus on how angry I am that this addiction can still affect me so strongly.  At the end of December it will be two years for me, and I have worked really hard to get to this point.  I have no intention of blowing it now.

    I know that this feeling will eventually pass.  I just have to hang in there.  But honestly, I find times like this so discouraging.  I can take a lot, but I absolutely hate when my lungs throb like this.  That is what made it so hard to quit in the first place.  Oh brother.
  2. steven, quit coach
    steven, quit coach avatar
    40 posts
    Registered:
    12 Sep 2018
    20 Nov 2018 in reply to treepeo
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    Treepeo,

    Congratulations on nearly 2 years being smoke-free, that is quite an accomplishment!

    Unfortunately, even after some time being quit, the odd craving can pop up sometimes, seemingly out of nowhere. This does not mean you have done something wrong in your quit. There are times when a random passing thought, action, or even an object can trigger a kind of associative response to remind you of when you smoked, but as you mentioned, this does pass, and you have already shown great strength in being nearly 2 years smoke-free already. You can (continue) to do this, you have the strength and determination in you!

    What has helped you in the past to get through tough cravings/urges? Do you think you could try them now to help get through this urge?

    If you have concerns/further questions in regards to urges or dealing with them, feel free to give us a call at 1 877 513 5333.

    Wishing you the best,

    -Steven
    Last modified on 20 Nov 2018 09:42 by steven, quit coach
  3. efreeman75
    efreeman75 avatar
    285 posts
    Registered:
    02 Apr 2018
    20 Nov 2018
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    Hey Treepeo,

    Almost two years, simply amazing!!!

    You know what else is amazing?  Not having a craving for the past 5 months.  Seriously, think of where you were at 2 years ago.  If someone told you you could go 5 months without a craving, you would have called them a liar.  Don't feel guilty for having a craving, celebrate it and keep succeeding. 

    My father has been quit for 20+ years and says he still gets a couple of cravings a year.  It's just a reminder of the addicts we once were.

    Stay strong, get some exercise, a full night's sleep - whatever to keep the quit.

    E
  4. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    832 posts
    Registered:
    29 Nov 2017
    20 Nov 2018
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    Well, what a difference a day makes (or in this case, a night).  I managed to fall asleep last night and when I woke up, the cravings were gone.  Whew!  Sorry if I sounded glum.  It just took me off guard and as I said, I really hate when my lungs throb like that.

    Given that I smoked almost my whole life, I think I will always get cravings from time to time.  And maybe that's a good thing after all, because it is a clear reminder that I can never have even one puff ever.  And the truth of the matter is, I really enjoy the freedom that comes with being a non-smoker and I never want to go back to the way things were.  So it's all good.

    Thanks so much for your support.  As always, it means a lot.
  5. lillian, quit coach
    lillian, quit coach avatar
    208 posts
    Registered:
    28 Nov 2017
    20 Nov 2018
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    hi treepeo,

    No need to apologize. Feeling discouraged with the strength of that craving and the unexpectedness of it is completely understandable.

    I wouldn't be surprised if we've all felt that way at one point or another in our quits, 2 weeks or 2 years into a quit, is all too frustratingly common.

    I am so glad it eased up for you. Looking back, I hope that you can see how you made sure that you didn't succumb. You did it again treepeo! With each one of these, you get even stronger.

    Of course, always remember for tough moments especially like that, our community is here.

    Amazing work treepeo.

    Lillian


    Last modified on 20 Nov 2018 20:40 by lillian, quit coach
  6. shazzan
    shazzan avatar
    140 posts
    Registered:
    06 Nov 2018
    22 Nov 2018 in reply to lillian, quit coach
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    Treepeo

    I am so sorry you had to endure that physical pain again. You are strong and determined and i have no doubt you will rebound from this . Just wanted to be here for you as you were there for me in my early days.  I know you won't let this stop you from achieving your goal. 
     
    t
    Last modified on 23 Nov 2018 15:08 by Quit Coach 16
  7. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
    1476 posts
    Registered:
    28 Nov 2017
    22 Nov 2018
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    Hi Treepeo

    Is ok, do not be so hard in you, you been free for long time, sleep is ok, just go back and enjoy the freedom again!
  8. merline, quit coach
    merline, quit coach avatar
    92 posts
    Registered:
    12 Sep 2018
    22 Nov 2018 in reply to treepeo
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    Good Afternoon Treepeo,

    Congratulations for staying smoke-free.

    It's not surprising if you're experiencing cravings to smoke that remind you of nicotine withdrawal. Your mind has a powerful influence on your body, and a strong focus on thoughts of smoking can bring on some very real physical reactions. Sensations like tension in the throat, neck, and stomach, as well as jumpy nerves and headaches, are common and mimic the responses you had to physical withdrawal from nicotine.

    The Rewards of Quitting
    Now that you’ve quit, it’s a good idea to keep track of the benefits that you’re getting from not smoking. Make a list of your rewards as you go, keep it handy, and refer to it often – especially when cravings hit. For example, “I feel less out of breath when I take the stairs” or “I’m saving money every day.”

    Aside from the benefits, remember to reward yourself for staying smoke-free. Rewarding is one of the most important things you can do to help yourself stay on track.

    If you have any questions or concerns about quitting, you can call a Smokers’ Helpline Quit Coach at 1-877-513-5333.


    Merline
8 posts, 0 answered