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Starting Again

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  1. tuckerpen
    tuckerpen avatar
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    29 Aug 2019
    29 Aug 2019
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    Started my quit back in March. With the help of Champix I was able to go a week before I gave in the first time....I would restart my quit right away, go another few days and cheat again.I smoked most of August. Really hard during summer just to overcome the triggers that have been there for the past 35 years. Well summer is almost over and I have decided enough is enough. it's been 17 hours so far...........this time it's gonna stop !!
  2. atp
    atp avatar
    496 posts
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    31 Dec 2018
    29 Aug 2019 in reply to tuckerpen
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    tuckerpen,

    Congrats on being committed to keep going through all these months of trying to get your quit to stick. Take what you've learned from your relapses and see if you can use that to help you stick it out this time. Over all these months and you're still trying tells me that you want this. Just dig deep and see your way through. 

    The best I can offer, after many failed quit attempts myself, is that you need to commit to your quit 100%. NOPE - Not one puff ever. Educate yourself on the quitting process, make it a positive by looking for the benefits of quitting. I bet your blood pressure is already lower after 17 hours not smoking. It happens that fast. In a few days your breathing will start to get better. You'll start to smell better, and on and on. 

    Last modified on 29 Aug 2019 16:00 by atp
  3. tuckerpen
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    29 Aug 2019
    29 Aug 2019 in reply to atp
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    Thanks ATP
    funny thing is I've gone 9,14,17 days without a smoke.....then it's a stupid trigger of sitting on the deck or the lake with a smoke, a memory etc that makes me wanna have one............just gotta get over those triggers
  4. atp
    atp avatar
    496 posts
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    29 Aug 2019 in reply to tuckerpen
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    Triggers are a real pain to trying to keep your quit. Not just that but when trying to quit doing anything without associating it with smoking is near impossible. 

    I tossed all my smoking stuff a few days into my quit and spent a whole day cleaning my van, office, jackets, etc. just to avoid temptation. It is hard. 

    Truth is, there are still times where I get nostalgic about smoking. Just last weekend I was out fishing and I just missed having a cigar while sitting on the boat - that is purely routine and habit, but still.....So yeah i need to be vigilant. 

    A week ago my wife was using a THC/CBD vape she bought to help her get to sleep, and I  picked it up to try it , well she grabbed that sucker out of my hand so fast and said that she wants no part in being responsible for me starting to smoke again. You know after thinking about it for a few days - she was right. The addict in my head would awaken and then who knows.....

    Willpower. You need to commit. 
    Last modified on 29 Aug 2019 16:39 by atp
  5. atp
    atp avatar
    496 posts
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    29 Aug 2019 in reply to atp
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    My last quit I went cold turkey, so after a week of not smoking the other incentive I had was that I didn't want to go through the nicotine withdrawal again. After about a month I started to value my quit. It was worth way more than blowing it for a smoke. Plus I was sure that one smoke would lead to me buying a pack a day in short order. 
  6. treepeo
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    31 Aug 2019 in reply to atp
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    atp, thank goodness your wife grabbed that vape from you.  You can't inhale ANYTHING because it will jeopardize your quit.  I know that I can's smoke, toke or vape, period.  Not that I was ever interested in the latter two, but still, I am absolutely positive that if I used anything of the sort even once, I would blow my quit.  And you would probably be at risk, too.  So don't chance it.  You have worked too hard to get to this point and like you said, you value your quit.  It's just not worth taking a chance.
  7. brieffree
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    1476 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    31 Aug 2019
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    Hi tuckerpen

     You are doing great! all those feeling or triggers will go away and it will be les and less intensive by no time!
     The key is positive thinking, when the crave comes! Distract yourself with something healthy.
     Do something instead! walk around instead of thinking, try to focus in smoothing else.
     Speak with someone you know about how you feel! It might be so helpful, and supportive!
     Think how to prepare your self! Make a plan what to do when the crave comes! It really works!

     It took me a long time to stick with my quit Plan! I quit 3 pks a day!
     Is just your Mind tricking you, you are stronger than that!
    Give your self a big huge! You ca do this!  
  8. linda, quit coach
    linda, quit coach avatar
    146 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    31 Aug 2019
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    Hi tuckerpen, 
     
    Welcome and congratulations for taking this important decision to quit smoking again. You are doing something remarkable...something that will bring positive changes in your life and enhance your health and well-being – Way to go! We are so happy for you! 

    With your hard work, commitment and determination, we believe that you can succeed. You have quit back in March, so it shows that you have the skills, the strength and what it takes to do this again! Keep moving in this way, you are doing fantastic! 

    As we know, quitting smoking is a process and it can take time. The first few days of quitting can be difficult and the cravings can be tough. Hang in there! They don’t last as long as people think they do. When you think about smoking or want a cigarette, do everything you can to get out of that situation. Do something else or go somewhere else just to keep your mind distracted from the thoughts of smoking. 

    Many people find helpful to use the 4 D’s: distract, delay, deep breathing and drink water. Others will use nicotine replacement products to reduce their cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Also, avoiding temptations or triggers, changing your routine and habits, keeping your hands and mind busy and reaching for your support system, all these strategies will be helpful. Being flexible, creative and gentle in your approach will also help you. 

    Tuckerpen, you know yourself best, you know what works for you and you can rely on your experience, your strengths and reasons for quitting. You can do it! 

    We are thrilled for you and thank you for sharing your journey with us! 

    Wishing you continued success! 
8 posts, 0 answered