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3 days 5 hours 29 minutes... new non-smoker introduction

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  1. lisads
    lisads avatar
    22 posts
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    21 Feb 2019
    22 Feb 2019
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    I'm 3 days 5 hours 29 minutes smoke free. I have quit a few times over the past 54 years but the only time that lasted longer than a year was when I was pregnant. I'm pretty good at quitting for a few days but I haven't done that for a few years now.

    I am surprised at how emotional I am feeling. I'm snippy with my partner and teenager at home... my partner smokes and is trying to be supportive but it is complicated (or maybe just scary) for him. I'm ok at work. But I am counting the hours until I can go home and curl up with a book or movie and not talk to anyone. 

    I've got a great quit plan. I'm holding on to the "Not one puff ever" saying. I'm exercising, drinking tons of water, meditating and generally being easy on myself. 

    So I'm posting here as I'm told it's a good idea... and I can't eat anymore carrot sticks or tic tacs!!!

    Thanks for being here, I've gotten a lot of help and inspiration from reading the posts.
    Last modified on 22 Feb 2019 14:41 by lisads
  2. atp
    atp avatar
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    22 Feb 2019 in reply to lisads
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    Congrats on your quit and welcome to the forum. 

    You sound so all together and organized with your quit. That is a huge piece of the puzzle. 

    'Not one puff ever' saved me a few times. 
  3. kate r, quit coach
    kate r, quit coach avatar
    49 posts
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    16 Jan 2019
    22 Feb 2019 in reply to lisads
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    Welcome to the forum and community lisads! You are already off to a great start; congratulations on choosing to become smoke-free!

    Feeling emotional or having changes in mood is quite common when you are quitting. Withdrawal symptoms can include irritability, restlessness, and difficulty concentrating. While these are unpleasant symptoms, they are normal and should eventually go away as your body adjusts.

    Living with another smoker would be a challenging situation, although it is good to hear he is trying to be supportive and you have developed a quit plan. It sounds as though you are determined to quit and stay smoke-free. You are using a number of great strategies that will help you with cravings.

    We are happy you posted and have been inspired by others who have reached out to the community. As atp demonstrates: our community members are engaging, helpful and supportive.

    All the best with your quit!

    - Kate R
    Last modified on 22 Feb 2019 16:00 by kate r, quit coach
  4. lisads
    lisads avatar
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    21 Feb 2019
    22 Feb 2019
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    Thank you for the welcome atp and kate r. 

    Luckily we never smoked in the house so it is safe... but it is hard having a partner that isn't ready to quit. I've asked him not to smoke in front of me, or to leave cigarettes or lighters laying around and to wash his hands and teeth when around me. So far so good.

  5. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
    1476 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    22 Feb 2019
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    Hello lisads

    Welcome to helpline!

    I read your post and Wo! you are incredible! Congratulations in your quit!
    And as you said your partner support you, is very important that you need to share what you need from them to help you!
    I am sure you will find more support and who knows, maybe he quit too...

    No matter what!! Not a puff ever! you can do this!
  6. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    832 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    23 Feb 2019
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    Hi lisads,

    It is great that you joined our community.  Welcome!  And congratulations on making the decision to quit.

    Not One Puff Ever is my motto.  Every one of us has to live by that motto, because one puff will lead us right back to where we started, which is a full blown addict.  And who wants that?

    I can understand that you are emotional.  When we don't get the chemicals we are used to getting, it does something to both our bodies and our minds.  Quitting challenges us in so many ways, which is why I maintain that people who quit are way stronger than they give themselves credit for.

    It sounds like you are doing all of the right things to make your quit successful.  The most important thing is to put yourself first, even if that seems to go against the grain.  It won't last forever, but it is necessary to get you through the worst of the quitting process.  You are important, and right now you need to focus on yourself.  One step at a time.  And remember.  It will get easier over time.  You just have to get through the rough patch first.

    Celebrate every victory, no matter how small.  It all adds up and moves you closer to your goal.  You can do this, lisads.  Believe in yourself.
  7. lisads
    lisads avatar
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    21 Feb 2019
    23 Feb 2019
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    Thanks for the encouragement brieffree and treepeo!!! 

    I'm still smoke free and holding on to Not One Puff Ever... it's good to have a motto! I feel very strange this morning, unfocused, very annoyed at a squeaky tap, I'm going to meditate then exercise and know that will get me through the next hour and make the crazy cravings I'm having go away.

    I can stay smoke free for another day... it's a Saturday... I can do what I need and this crazy feeling will pass. 
  8. atp
    atp avatar
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    23 Feb 2019 in reply to lisads
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    Lisa,

    Keep it up. Day 4 already. Nicotine is basically out of your system already! 

    Try to keep occupied. As the physical withdrawal effects start to taper off you'll still be left with the habit/routine side - the not having a smoke when we used to always have one. 2 months later I still check my coat pocket for the non-existent smoke pack before going out the door.

    Not sure if you are using NRT's or going cold turkey. I went cold turkey and for me the worst of the withdrawal was passing before the end of the first week. The first 3-5 days were always the hardest for me in past quits. You're almost over the 'hump' so keep up it up. Just focus of getting through to the next meal, next commercial break, the next minute - whatever it takes to beat down that craving. 
    Last modified on 23 Feb 2019 11:45 by atp
  9. lisads
    lisads avatar
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    25 Feb 2019
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    6 days, 7 hours and 48 minutes... and I'm starting to be less edgy and angry! I'm going to do this!

    Still using the Not One Puff Ever mantra!

    I keep asking myself how long should I not drink for? FYI, that is usually my downfall.
  10. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    832 posts
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    25 Feb 2019
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    Hi lisads,

    You are doing great, keep it up!

    I think drinking is a trigger for most people.  You are still in the very early days of your quit.  If alcohol was your downfall in the past, stay away from it for the foreseeable future.  You should have a really good grip on your quit before you even consider having a drink.
  11. lisads
    lisads avatar
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    26 Feb 2019 in reply to treepeo
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    Thanks treepeo,

    I kinda knew that but now can't say I didn't! :) 
  12. jenna c, quit coach
    jenna c, quit coach avatar
    58 posts
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    29 Nov 2018
    26 Feb 2019
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    Good evening!

    First off, congrats lisads for making it this far and Day 6! Glad to hear you are experiencing less withdrawal symptoms. Using mantras like "Not One Puff Ever" along with positive self-talk messages can be very useful and encouraging psychologically. Here are other affirmations
    that may be helpful:

    - "I'm doing this for my health, to smell better, and to save money"
    - "I've made it this far, I'm not starting over."
    - "Smoking won't fix this. It will only make another problem."
    - "Smoking is not an option, this shall pass."
    - "I am going to continue to be a former smoker."

    Knowing your triggers and having a plan to cope is important when quitting. So if alcohol is yours, its a good idea to avoid until feeling very confident. If it's an unavoidable social situation, then consider a nicotine replacement therapy or having something in your hands to keep distracted.

    Keep up the good work you all!

    -Jenna C

  13. lisads
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    26 Feb 2019
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    Thanks Jenna C.

    I’ve copied and pasted the affirmations into the notes on my phone for easy access when I struggle.
  14. butterflyna
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    135 posts
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    15 Feb 2018
    03 Mar 2019 in reply to lisads
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    Hi lisad,

    You are doing awesome!!! Wtg on your 6+ days! I'm just finishing up to 3 days smoke free. It sounds like you are going cold turkey ...Give yourself a big ol pat on the back. I think you are gonna do this ... Not One Puff Ever!!! Excellent motto!
    Alcohol was a major issue for me. I chose to quit that before the cigarettes. It was just what I had to do. I get the feeling you already know what you have to do. All I can say is go easy on yourself but be firm. These addictions are all life altering for us. Keep up the fantastic work!

    butterflyna
  15. efram, quit coach
    efram, quit coach avatar
    210 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    04 Mar 2019 in reply to butterflyna
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    Hi All,

    I'm just reading this thread for the first time. Lisad, thank you for joining in the community and letting us know how you're doing. I hope that you're still standing strong and heading in the right direction. Sometimes with quitting it can be "two steps forward and one step back," but as long as you keep facing forward you'll get to where you are going!

    Butterflyna, I like the advice to "go easy on yourself but be firm." Too often we are hard on ourselves, and this can make it harder to make positive changes. When we can be kind to ourselves and stand up firmly for ourselves, whether against an addiction like smoking or otherwise -- we can move mountains.  
    Last modified on 04 Mar 2019 09:51 by efram, quit coach
  16. butterflyna
    butterflyna avatar
    135 posts
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    15 Feb 2018
    04 Mar 2019 in reply to efram, quit coach
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    Hi efram,

    Thank you. I hope lisads is still with us. She was doing awesome! All these great people inspire me so much! Keep coming back!!

    butterflyna
16 posts, 0 answered