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First Day

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  1. rosie1931
    rosie1931 avatar
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    27 Sep 2018
    09 Oct 2018
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    Feeling proud and terrified at the same time.  I decided to quit four weeks ago, when I came to the realization that my fear of smoking and slowly killing myself daily far outweighed my fear of trying to quit.  I'm here now though, and although I'm able to resist the urges, they are constant and continuous. I'm reading some other posts and seemingly some people say that it gets worse, but I'm just wondering if that's a mindset, and if you're positive about the experience it doesn't have to get harder?
  2. treepeo
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    29 Nov 2017
    09 Oct 2018
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    Hi rosie1931,

    A positive attitude will go a long way in helping you to quit.

    When I first quit, I told myself that I would always be kind to people, and not use quitting as an excuse to be nasty to others.  So in fact, when I went back to work after the Christmas break, I was almost giddy.  I was determined to be nice no matter how I was feeling.  And those who knew I was quitting were absolutely shocked by my positive attitude.  But I wanted to feel excited about my quit.  I kept telling myself that I was doing something truly amazing, and that I should stay the course no matter what.  And that mindset really helped.

    Keep fighting those cravings, rosie.  Do something you like at least once per day, and keep busy.  Hours turn into days, and days turn into weeks.  It's amazing how time flies.  You can quit for good.  Believe in yourself and don't worry, be happy! 
  3. efreeman75
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    09 Oct 2018
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    Hi Rosie - yes, there will be tough times.  Sometimes instances, sometimes hours, and sometimes days.  The secret is to cherish the tough times.  Finding joy in the smallest things can be addictive and will help you get over any hump that life may throw at you.  Attitude is altitude - it's time to spread your wings and soar above any illusion of the benefits that smoking offered.  Congratulations on your decision to quit smoking.
  4. rosie1931
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    09 Oct 2018 in reply to treepeo
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    Thanks Treepeo,

    I'm sure I won't manage "giddy" but knowing that some people have a positive outlook surely helps.  And yes, about time flying.  I've told myself many times today, that years from now, if I don't succeed, I'll look back on today and know that I missed an opportunity.  Thank you for your support!
  5. rosie1931
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    09 Oct 2018 in reply to efreeman75
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    Hi efreeman,

    Thank you.  I've been working on the illusions for the last four weeks regarding the false benefits of smoking.  I'm just hoping the experience won't be as bad as some people have posted and keeping a healthy positive attitude will help.  
  6. sarah, quit coach
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    144 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    09 Oct 2018
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    Hello rosie1931 - congrats on being smoke-free for four wks - what an awesome accomplishment.
    Cravings can be frustrating and can even show up at unexpected times, but they are a regular part of quitting. And two of our fantastic community members have responded, and confirmed, what sounds like your already knew: attitude can have a huge impact on your quit journey. Some great suggestions from treepeo and efreeman75 to keep that positivity elevated on those trickier days, and ways to enjoy your approach on those - it may happen! - giddy days.
    Have you found anything in particular that has worked to keep a positive attitude at the forefront of your quit?
    Thank you so much for your post and keep up the good work.
    Sarah
  7. rosie1931
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    10 Oct 2018 in reply to sarah, quit coach
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    I wish it was four weeks.  It's only been two days, but I'm feeling stronger than I did yesterday and more resolved.  Last night was a bit of a challenge, so I decided to get an NRT today to help with the cravings and withdrawal symptoms. 
  8. efreeman75
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    10 Oct 2018
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    Congratulations Rosie - 2 days is an awesome start to 4 weeks.  E
  9. brieffree
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    28 Nov 2017
    11 Oct 2018 in reply to rosie1931
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    Hi Rosie

    Congrats in 2 smoke free day's, you are doing it, what you feel is Normal, your Body and Mind are cleaning up from Nicotine, Every quit is different than other. I can tell you that it gets so much easier every day!

    You need to distrct your self from that Moment!
    Drink a lot water!
    Do something instead!
    Be Nice with your self, regard your self every time you win the Battle!
    Find what to do instead! must be healthy

    Hang in there!
  10. rosie1931
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    11 Oct 2018 in reply to brieffree
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    Thanks brieffree and efrreman.  I do feel kinda great!  Day 3, and it does feel easier already.  Again, might just be that I'm able to keep a positive attitude.  Also, and I'd like to pass this tip onto someone who is just thinking about their quit.  I did use Nic Outs for over a year to filter out most of the tar and nicotine.  Not with the intention of quitting, but just so that I may be doing myself less harm.  Maybe smoking less nicotine for two years has now helped with the withdrawal?  I'm only finding that insomnia is the worst.  
  11. efreeman75
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    11 Oct 2018
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    Rosie - Happy to hear you're feeling great.  Oh, and I remember the insomnia.  The delirious insomnia!  I had to put myself on a strict regiment of a calming, sleepytime tea at 9:00 every night followed by wasa bread with peanut butter and a glass of milk at 9:30.  Tea would calm me ready for sleep.  And the carb/protein/calcium mix helped me to sleep through a little better.  Up in bed by 10:00.  I will assure you, however, it does get better.
  12. merline, quit coach
    merline, quit coach avatar
    87 posts
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    12 Sep 2018
    11 Oct 2018 in reply to rosie1931
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    Hi Rosie,

    First of all congratulations on your quit and don't give up because you should begin to feel better very soon. Please note that sleep disturbances are a common side effect of nicotine withdrawal.

    Some of these tips may help you

    1. Cut Out the Caffeine
    Caffeine is a stimulant. Eliminating your caffeine intake, especially after 6 pm, can help

    2. A routine to relax your body at night helps some people fall asleep
     Light a few candles, use some scented bath salts, and let the stress of the day go. A warm bath is an excellent way to relax your body and mind in preparation for sleep.

    3. Have a Cup of Herbal Tea
    There are a variety of herbal teas blended specifically to help soothe and promote sleep.

    5. Listen to Soothing Music
    Soft, mellow music can help you loosen up enough to drift off to sleep. Try listening to a recording of waves hitting the beach. Soft sounds can be a very good sleep aid

    6. Drink a Glass of Warm Milk
    Spice it up with a little honey and cardamom or nutmeg. Warm milk helps you sleep due to the fact that it is a food rich in the amino acid L-tryptophan. 

     8. Don’t Drink Alcohol
    Alcohol disrupts sleep. A few drinks may make it easier to fall asleep initially, but alcohol in the system will often cause you to wake up just a few hours into the sleep cycle.

    9. Get Some Exercise
    Even a short 15-minute walk will help, but if you can't sleep, try getting out for a nice long walk a few hours before bed.

    10. Meditate
    Meditation helps start your day on the right foot and end it nicely, too. As a sleep aid, try meditation in bed, laying quietly, eyes closed. Start by focusing on the muscles in your body, consciously relaxing them, section by section.

    The physical withdrawal phase of smoking cessation is a temporary condition. Your sleep patterns will return to normal soon, providing you didn’t have insomnia before you quit smoking. If symptoms persist beyond the first month or so, schedule a visit with your doctor to make sure smoking cessation is responsible for how you're feeling.


    Hang in there!
    One day at a time.
    Merline
12 posts, 0 answered