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Welcome

6 posts, 0 answered
  1. donl
    donl avatar
    4 posts
    Registered:
    13 Dec 2017
    15 Dec 2017
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    Hi everyone..........this is my first post.  I've been smoke free for about 3 weeks.   Sometimes I wonder if I'm going to break some kind of record for most times a person has quit!  I stopped counting at 20 (I'm 57 years old).  So I guess you could say I'm just so good at being a quitter I can't stop doing it!  In reality one of my fears in quitting is knowing if I do start again how hard I am on myself.  I deal with a lot of physical pain everyday, and Christmas is  bad time of year for me (most relatives don't talk to me anymore.  Trying to think positive, but not doing a good job at that. 
  2. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
    782 posts
    Registered:
    28 Nov 2017
    15 Dec 2017
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    Donl

    Welcome to helpline.
    Congrats in 3 weeks smoke free! As you said about that fear, do not make it real and you will built confidence.
    Holliday's are challenging due to different rezones, but make it easy staying Smoke free!
  3. cassandra2310
    cassandra2310 avatar
    11 posts
    Registered:
    12 Dec 2017
    16 Dec 2017
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    Hi Donl, Welcome!!!

    Congrats on 3 weeks! Your a superstar :) Give yourself a pat on the back, it's a huge hurdle to quit. At least you keep trying which is the best thing you can do for yourself. Maybe this will be the last time you'll have to worry about quiting, and you'll finally be completely smokefree. Leave yourself notes around the house congratulating yourself, download apps on your phone that give you encouragement. Look in the mirror and say to yourself "Im worth it!"  
  4. donl
    donl avatar
    4 posts
    Registered:
    13 Dec 2017
    17 Dec 2017 in reply to brieffree
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    thanks, my mornings are the worst (both physically and emotionally).  My partner got the cold/flu about 2 weeks ago, and I thought I caught it about a day ago.  (my throat was so sore I thought I might have cancer, but it's okay now just went to my lungs and sinuses).  I started this pill for bone density, and looked up the side effects this morning.  I have every one.....which includes flu like symptons........joint pain/back pain........my knees are the sooooooooooo bad, and for the first time in my life my right thumb hurts (even to get gum out of the package).......my stomach goes nuts when I quit,........but that a side effect too.  It's a weekly pill.  also I've been getting dizzy, which does happen when I get the cold/flu.  I know that smoking won't help anything
  5. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    498 posts
    Registered:
    29 Nov 2017
    17 Dec 2017
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    Hi donl,

    You have over three weeks under your belt now.  Keep your momentum going.  Be stronger than your addiction.  

    As you know, smoking is bad for your health, but it is also bad for your bones.  So if you can stay smoke free, you will be doing yourself a huge favour.

    Just tell yourself that you will have Not One Puff Ever.  You can do it, donl, believe in yourself.
  6. paul, quit coach
    paul, quit coach avatar
    22 posts
    Registered:
    29 Nov 2017
    18 Dec 2017
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    Hi everyone, and thank you for your responses.

    Welcome donl, it's great to see you posting. There is some great advice here, and we hope that you do pat yourself on the back, and that you are able to make it through this Christmas/holiday season.

    Some people find it easier to think about it One day at a Time. As counselors, we often hear people saying that the temptation comes later on for some, 3 weeks or 3 months after quitting, and they don't know why. It could be because some people are better being in the moment. If we get through today, and then do it again tomorrow, then we stay in the day, and not use words like, 'never, forever, etc.', as this can be scary to some. Once we know we can actually succeed, this can actually cause some of these thoughts, and it's a sign of progress, though some people get scared by these feelings and cravings coming 'out of nowhere'.

    If we do the best we can every day, celebrate every day as a victory, and then prepare for the next day, this might be easier than thinking that you'll never smoke again. Instead of thinking 'never getting to smoke again', you might just realize how lucky you are for not 'having to' do that anymore. 

    As always, it's a matter of personal choice, and how you would like to frame it for your own sense of comfort.

    Good night everyone. If we're smoke free at day's end, let's celebrate. If not, let's all try again tomorrow. 

    Paul
    Last modified on 18 Dec 2017 02:12 by Quit Coach 12
6 posts, 0 answered