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Wits End

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  1. 2dreamers
    2dreamers avatar
    1 posts
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    29 Aug 2019
    08 Sep 2019
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    I have been on the 21mg patch and zyban twice a day for 4 weeks but i keep relapsing. I've probably gained a few pounds trying to eat better. I'm even using the mints but just can't seem to get thru a full week without a relapse. there's no specific times, situations etc just all of a sudden its like a panic attack until I cave and have one. Any suggestions
  2. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
    1474 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    09 Sep 2019
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    Hi there

     Seems like you have a good plan ahead, all you need is to Focus in your quit!
     Relapse or sleeps are only part of the quitting process!
     Relax yourself and go back  to the quit zone!

     Remember why you want to quit?
    You might find the power to let it goes!

     Distract yourself when the Crave comes!
     Drink plenty water
    Do something instead of thinking...

    All the best, never quit quitting!

    One day at the time!
    Last modified on 09 Sep 2019 07:45 by brieffree
  3. atp
    atp avatar
    491 posts
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    31 Dec 2018
    09 Sep 2019 in reply to 2dreamers
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    2dreamers,

    Quitting is tough, no matter what method you use. There's the physical addiction to nicotine, and then there's the habit/mental addiction to smoking that work against us being able to quit so easily. 

    So how committed to quitting are you? It seems you have been torturing yourself with withdrawals for a month now and relapsing, but also getting back to your quit. That seems pretty committed to me. So next step is to figure out how to learn from past relapses and improve your quit strategy. 

    Most smokers have tried to quit many times before they finally succeed. The one common thread to the quits that stick seems to be willpower to want to stick it out. At some point we just said enough. 

    So tell me - why do you want to quit? What steps are you taking to learn from the past slips?

  4. justfortoday
    justfortoday avatar
    168 posts
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    12 Aug 2019
    09 Sep 2019 in reply to 2dreamers
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    Hey, 2dreamers, I'm going to totally validate how hard this is. The panic is real, and the cravings can feel so much bigger than us.

    Something I read that helps me when it feels like I'm going to turn inside out from a craving is this: I stop and really become mindful of the physical feelings. Is it in my chest, is it in my stomach? Once I pinpoint it, I am able to see that it isn't "painful" like a headache or tooth ache. The panicky feelings come from the fear that my cravings will never go away! The hell of constantly having to battle this is my new normal forever. Totally overwhelming, right?
    But I'm learning that each time I say "no", to a craving, the less power that fear has. And every "no" gets a tiny bit easier each time. Make sense?

    You're not alone.
  5. atp
    atp avatar
    491 posts
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    31 Dec 2018
    10 Sep 2019 in reply to justfortoday
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    justfortoday,

    Wow. Look at you rocking your quit and how far you've come already! 

    The cravings subside and as the days and weeks pass you will find you are starting to become a non-smoker. Before long you'll turn a corner where you aren't struggling to keep your quit every moment. I can still remember that first day where I just went about my day and it hit me when I got back home that I didn't think about smoking - that felt good. 
  6. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    832 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    10 Sep 2019
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    Hi 2dreamers,

    Quitting is hard, no question about it.  You have to resolve to be stronger than your addiction, and not give in no matter what it takes.  You may have to talk it out with someone.  You might have to go for a walk, scream, cry, punch a pillow, stuff your face with junk food.  Whatever it takes to just not give in.  I used to wait for the craving to pass in 10 minute increments, because anyone can wait for 10 minutes.  Yes, sometimes it all added up to 1.5 hours or so, but by taking it 10 minutes at a time, I was able to get through it.

    Each time you resist the cravings, it gets just a little bit easier. 

    If you can quit now, you won't have to worry about standing out in the cold of winter any more.  Won't that be nice?
  7. manderson4
    manderson4 avatar
    187 posts
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    28 Nov 2017
    11 Sep 2019
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    Hi 2Dreamers

    Don't beat yourself up about relapsing. Quitting Smoking is tough but doable. The first time I quit I gained 20 pounds, but I learned from it and continue to learn from it. The 4 D's help
    Drink Water
    Distract yourself
    Deep Breathe
    Delay
    I found for myself sometimes removing myself from the situation helps. Going for a walk, a bike ride, petting your pet all help. I have even gone for a walk to the arena just across the street to watch kids play hockey because the arena is non-smoking.
    If the quits happen during regular hours call Smokers Helpline and talk to a coach. Come here to the forum and read a bit or even rant about how hard is. You got this.
  8. efram, quit coach
    efram, quit coach avatar
    197 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    17 Sep 2019
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    Hi 2dreamers,

    The great news here is that most of the time you're not smoking!

    Hopefully some of these tips have been helpful over the past week or so! I especially like the idea of deep breathing through the panic. Its been an effective strategy for many, and is part of what makes smoking feel relaxing (the inhale/exhale sends an automatic message to the brain to relax).

    A few more suggestions:

    It can help to get rid of any remaining cigarettes. This will make it harder to slip or relapse during those harder times, and easier to find another way to cope.

    And it may also help to use those mints more often to lessen your withdrawal symptoms (as long as you don't exceed the manufacturer's guidelines). The mints don't deliver nicotine as fast as a cigarette does -- so they're not the best for when the cravings are intense -- but if you use them fairly consistently they can help to even things out so you don't get to that panic point.

    On the other hand, if you'd like to try something faster-acting, QuickMist (a nicotine mouth srpay) will usually satisfy a craving within a minute or two.

    Hope this helps,
    Efram
  9. optimist
    optimist avatar
    20 posts
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    11 Jul 2019
    17 Sep 2019 in reply to treepeo
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    "You have to resolve to be stronger than your addiction".
  10. brightside
    brightside avatar
    2 posts
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    18 Sep 2019
    18 Sep 2019 in reply to 2dreamers
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    Hey Wits End,
    I quit cold turkey 58 days ago.  I truly feel that I have won the battle this time because I started thinking about things a little differently.  Like you, I tried patches, gum, champix and pretty much any way that I felt would make it easier...lets be honest...there is no way to make it easy only ways to make you stronger and fight it so this is my reasoning for going cold turkey...
    If I use the patch, I am still a slave to the nicotine...I am no ones slave and neither are you.
    Nicotine is not the part that is killing you but it is the enabler...you have to get over the nicotine so for me, I couldnt get over it with the patches..I know a lot of people have success with them but sometimes its just better to rip off the bandaid.
    Dont be afraid of the panic, embrace it because that is your body telling you you are getting control again.  
    Dont be afraid of the dread as its again your body trying to fight you, you are stronger than the feelings so treat it like a work out if that makes sense...the painful situps are the ones that help you the most.
    over the weeks before I quit for good I set quit dates several times and even though I didnt keep them, I made sure I made another quit date right away and eventually it stuck.
    Eventually your body is going to tell you you quit for good but you just cant give up on yourself.  
    Hopefully I dont sound confusing as I know quitting is a personal thing, dont worry about anyones expectations other than yourselves.  You will get over it just never stop trying.

10 posts, 0 answered