Forums / My journey / Confronting One's Own Addiction

Confronting One's Own Addiction

8 posts, 0 answered
  1. optimist
    optimist avatar
    20 posts
    Registered:
    11 Jul 2019
    28 Sep 2019
    Link to this post
    I read in a post on this site that somebody knew they needed to confront their addiction head on.  I need to do that as well.  Have been on the patch a few days, but have stopped using it because in the past for me it hasn't resulted in a successful quit - I need to confront my addiction head on.  So I'm posing the question to the experts - those people who frequent this site - how does one "confront" one's addiction?
  2. renee, quitcoach
    renee, quitcoach avatar
    115 posts
    Registered:
    16 Jul 2018
    28 Sep 2019 in reply to optimist
    Link to this post
    Hello Optimist,

    What do you mean when you say you have to confront your addiction head on? Do you mean you want to quit without using any nicotine replacement therapy like the patch? The most important thing is to do what’s best for you. 

    However, generally speaking, the highest success rate is for people who actively use a medical treatment like the nicotine patch or nicotine gum and also use counselling and support. 

    Also remember just because the patch didn’t work for you the first time, doesn’t mean it won’t work for you this time. 

    All the best and please let us know how you are doing,

    Renee 
    Last modified on 28 Sep 2019 20:56 by renee, quitcoach
  3. justfortoday
    justfortoday avatar
    168 posts
    Registered:
    12 Aug 2019
    28 Sep 2019 in reply to optimist
    Link to this post
    Hi optimist
    I'm still a rookie in this world of the non smoker, but I wanted to reach out as I understand the power of our addiction and the need to confront it.

    What that looks like is going to be as individual as the person who carries this addiction.

    For me, "confronting" means seeing who I was as a smoker and then visualizing who I want to be as a non smoker. Then I dig deep to defend and cultivate that vision.

    I see myself struggling in a rain storm trying to balance an umbrella while desperately trying to light a cigarette. And then I see myself not ashamed of how I smell, or smiling because I'm proud I made it another day.

    With regards to the patch, again a personal choice, I tried cold turkey and it was too much for me to cope with. I'm using the patch now so that I can deal with "confronting" my emotional dependency. And it is working for me.

    I hope you have an easy night, optimist.



  4. optimist
    optimist avatar
    20 posts
    Registered:
    11 Jul 2019
    29 Sep 2019
    Link to this post
    Good Morning Renee and justfortoday:

    Thank you for your replies.  I think that "confronting my addiction" really means, for me, confronting my self.  My own attitudes and behaviour patterns.  Of which I'm not proud.

    It seems to me that a big problem  has been wanting the results, but not wanting to do the work or do it consistently.  As immature and ridiculous as that sounds, I believe that that has been my problem all along.   It's like wanting to obtain a university degree without consistently doing the work.  And there's a lot of work to be done!  I was always a "good student", but for some reason that has been lacking in my attempts to become smoke free (or lose weight).  I work hard for some time, then just let it all go.  So the commitment I need to make is not just to obtaining the results, but also to consistently doing the work over time.  I have decided to continue using the patch.

    justfortoday I agree that "confronting" is going to look different for each individual.  The "before" and "after" images you hold of yourself are, I expect, powerful aids.  I'll seek such images to use for myself.  Thank you for your empathy and for reaching out.  I wish you and all visitors to this site a successful smoke free day.

  5. atp
    atp avatar
    496 posts
    Registered:
    31 Dec 2018
    30 Sep 2019 in reply to optimist
    Link to this post
    Optimist,

    Quitting smoking is hard. It took me a lot of attempts before I finally had success. The key for me was recognizing that smoking is an addiction and learning how to deal with it. Willpower was needed. The choice to not smoke and being ready to argue against the addict in my head giving me all sorts of reasons why I should smoke. In the end it was my willpower to want to quit in those first days, and then I changed my focus to the value of my quit, and appreciating the benefits of quitting and all that I was gaining. 

    Use whatever quit aids will help you - nicotine gum/lozenge/mist, Champix, bubble gum, green tea, etc. But know that the aids are just that. It is you who will need to want to quit and have the willingness to say no to smoking. Justfortoday posted about being so desperate that it was off to the store to buy smokes and once there decided against it and walked right past the store. That is so true for all of us - we get to a point in our quit of deciding to smoke or not smoke. Once we decide to keep our quit it is worth that much more. 
  6. optimist
    optimist avatar
    20 posts
    Registered:
    11 Jul 2019
    30 Sep 2019
    Link to this post
    Merci atp.  I do have willpower.  Arguing with the addict within is sometimes tiring. I know that an aid is an aid is an aid, and that I'm the one who has to do the heavy lifting.  I hope that soon I'll be able to switch my focus to the benefits I'm noticing.

    Sweet dreams, tout le monde.
    Last modified on 30 Sep 2019 22:23 by optimist
  7. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    832 posts
    Registered:
    29 Nov 2017
    02 Oct 2019
    Link to this post
    Hi optimist,

    I knew for years that I was badly addicted to smoking.  I decided to quit cold turkey simply because I did not think an aid would really help me.  I did use the mist but only twice.  The first time I was shaking so bad from the cravings that I oversprayed my mouth, but it did help with the cravings.  The second time I used it, it did nothing for me so that was the end of that.

    What I found most helpful was the information I got from this site.  I had no idea how to go about quitting, and I got some great tips here.  I also loved all of the support I got from this wonderful online community.

    I kept telling myself that under no circumstances could I give in, because that is what I have always done in the past, and you can't get ahead that way.  It was hard to quit, I'm not going to lie.  But I refused to give in.  I drank lots of water, I distracted myself, and kept as busy as possible.  And I had naps whenever I could, because you don't crave when you sleep, and I thought it would help me to get through the day.  And my perseverance paid off.  I became a non-smoker.

    Try changing your routines, optimist.  Shake things up a bit.  And get excited.  Quitting is the best thing you could ever do for yourself.  You are starting a new chapter in your life, and you will enjoy it.  You can't beat the freedom that comes with being a non-smoker.
  8. optimist
    optimist avatar
    20 posts
    Registered:
    11 Jul 2019
    03 Oct 2019
    Link to this post
    Hi treepeo,

    Excellent advice - thank you!  I agree that you can't get ahead by giving in, which is what I have always done.  Fortunately I will be very busy for the next month, and I will try changing my routines.  After so many failed quit attempts, I have to say I find it difficult to "get excited".  Perhaps that will come in the future.  Your last sentence - I do believe that!
8 posts, 0 answered