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over 3 weeks

8 posts, 0 answered
  1. cec57
    cec57 avatar
    48 posts
    Registered:
    06 Nov 2018
    28 Jan
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    hi im back again glad to be here. its been over three weeks i quit smoking . i have really noticed the benefits since over the two week mark. also my husband quit a week after i did. so this time around it feels really good to quit. i have contacted the health unit here for help and i was open to alot of information for me to be more determined to quit this filthy habit. i feel this time around is my time to quit. i go through the post and find there is alot of good experiences and this motivates me even more. thanks for listening :)
  2. sarah, quit coach
    sarah, quit coach avatar
    176 posts
    Registered:
    28 Nov 2017
    28 Jan
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    Happy over 3 wks smoke-free anniversary to you, cec57! Way to go! 
    So exciting to already be feeling the perks of being a non-smoker, as it can continue to motivate you to stay smoke-free. 
    This is your time, this is your quit! 
    We are here to listen any time you need it.
    Warmly
    Sarah
    P.S. Congrats to your hubby too! 
  3. justfortoday
    justfortoday avatar
    168 posts
    Registered:
    12 Aug 2019
    29 Jan in reply to cec57
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    Hi cec57!

    Amazing progress! 

    I love reading posts like yours, and your determination is so solid. It sounds like you've gathered what you need to see this through.  

    Coming here was/is instrumental in my success, and I'm glad you're here too.

    Keep us posted!


  4. cec57
    cec57 avatar
    48 posts
    Registered:
    06 Nov 2018
    30 Jan
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    thanks sarah and justfortoday its always nice to be in contact with people who are willing to give support. in my past attempts at quitting seems to be the same im motivated at the beggining and then i hit a plateau of loss motivation and cave in. i can quit its to stay quit for the long run so  would you have any good suggestions for me. i need a variety of tools. thanks again
    Last modified on 30 Jan 2020 09:07 by cec57
  5. jenna lee, quit coach
    jenna lee, quit coach avatar
    222 posts
    Registered:
    28 Jun 2018
    30 Jan in reply to cec57
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    Hi cec57,

    I am sure a lot of people can relate to what you go through and also find their motivation can decrease over time. Here are some general tips to help keep your drive up:

    Review: 
    1. Why you quit,
    2. What rewards you are getting from quitting,
    3. Plans to deal with the barriers to staying quit
    4. Past relapses, what happened, and plan for similar circumstances

    Try to get as specific and detailed as you can with your answers.

    Hope this helps!

    Jenna Lee

  6. cec57
    cec57 avatar
    48 posts
    Registered:
    06 Nov 2018
    31 Jan
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    jenna lee
    thanks for the tips i will  think and plan as suggested .i want to make it right through this quit this time around im tired of picking up and throwing in the towel. thanks again
  7. justfortoday
    justfortoday avatar
    168 posts
    Registered:
    12 Aug 2019
    31 Jan in reply to cec57
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    Hi cec57,

    You are doing an amazing job and I have a really good feeling about your quit. I DO think you will stick with it for sure.  I wanted to share a couple of tips that really helped me stick with my quit. 

    1. Learn something new. As you may already know, nicotine stimulates dopamine in our brains and when we quit we need to find other ways to produce the "feel good" emotions. After doing some research, I discovered that one of the biggest producers of dopamine is learning. For me, I started to pick different countries that held interest for me and learned a bit about the culture and traditional cooking. I then picked a recipe from this country, bought everything I needed and prepared a meal. I started with Morocco and I'm now doing a lot of Nigerian cooking (my husband loves it as I've never been the cook in the family). Learning something new also helps with cravings as it forces one to focus on something else.

    2. I also learned that our brains do not easily accept "negative" thoughts. For example, when we start to crave a cigarette the first thing we say is "I want to smoke! I CAN'T SMOKE!" And this is all we can think of. It's freaking torture. When I started to feel that craving seeping into my thoughts I would say (and yes, sometimes out loud), "I really want to fill my belly with four deep breaths." And I would, and the craving would subside. Sometimes I had to do this about a thousand times a day … but it works.

    3. I stopped being afraid of the process and accepted this was going to suck. I was healing from an awful addiction and it was going to take work and time.

    4. I started to meditate. HUGE difference and trust me, I never bought into the whole "mindfulness" stuff, but hells ya, it works.

    5. I kept, and still keep a quit journal. When I just wanted to give up I would write down a page of who I was as a smoker (and really visualize myself smoking in a snowstorm, struggling to light up a cigarette under an umbrella, how I smelled, etc.), and then write another page of who I wanted to become as a non smoker … clean, fresh, in control over my addiction and empowered.

    I hope that some of this might help you, cec57, because I really want you to succeed. Just keep doing what you're doing because you're doing brilliantly!
  8. cec57
    cec57 avatar
    48 posts
    Registered:
    06 Nov 2018
    01 Feb in reply to justfortoday
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    hi justfortoday
    i appreciate you sharing your experience and many ways that has helped you along the way. i have already picked out some points that i will use in my journey. thxs again
8 posts, 0 answered