Emotional

7 posts, 0 answered
  1. darlenemel
    darlenemel avatar
    2 posts
    Registered:
    26 Feb 2018
    01 Mar
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    I am on day 2 of Zyban and bought the patch to start next week. I am not a very emotional person. my friends actually bug me about that. But I feel as though I am losing my best friend and want to cry thinking about March 6 2018 (quit day) Is that normal? I have never tried quitting in the past 26 years. 
  2. marianne, quit coach
    marianne, quit coach avatar
    209 posts
    Registered:
    30 Nov 2017
    01 Mar
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    Hello Darlenemel,

    So very normal what you are feeling about letting go of smoking.  And to take this step after 26 years makes so much sense as smoking has been part of your identity throughout these years.  What feels like a loss now won't in due time.  Start focusing on the gain as it truly is.  You are the same person yet will be a better version of yourself.  Can you describe what that will look like to you and to us? 

    Envisioning this new chapter in life to come is so valuable.  We look forward to walking with you through your self-discovery.  

    The very best to you as you approach your quit date.  Remember you made this choice and that means you are ready and can do it!  

    Marianne
  3. darlenemel
    darlenemel avatar
    2 posts
    Registered:
    26 Feb 2018
    01 Mar in reply to marianne, quit coach
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    Thank you so much for all your encouraging words and you have given me some things to think about. You nailed it when you said it is part of my identity.
    My life has revolved around smoking for so long that I really don’t know what to expect when I quit. It’s always been the way I have connected with people and has kept me occupied when I’m bored or stressed or need a break from work.
    I have always told myself when I turn 40 I will quit and next month I will be 41.  You’re right it’s time to move on to better things and a better me. Thank you ❤️
  4. marianne, quit coach
    marianne, quit coach avatar
    209 posts
    Registered:
    30 Nov 2017
    01 Mar
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    Hello Darlenemel,

    The unknown certainly can be frightening.  However, knowing it can only be better, brings such hope!  

    Wishing you all the very best as you set out make such an important decision in your life.  

    Please keep us up to date and feel free to share your quit plan with us.  

    Marianne
    Last modified on 17 Nov 2018 14:11 by marianne, quit coach
  5. cls65
    cls65 avatar
    6 posts
    Registered:
    28 Feb 2018
    13 Mar in reply to darlenemel
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    Those thoughts are so very normal. I quit  many times over the years and so far haven't managed to stay quit. When I finally got a grip on the physical withdraw symptoms I was experiencing I was floored by the psychological effect quitting had. I totally felt like I lost my best friend, depression and wanting to isolate. I pretty much talked myself right back into smoking by telling myself it just wasn't worth it, I guess I will just die smoking. Well, here I am again, 2 days into quitting again, taking Champix. I know now that in addition to the support of meds etc.. the most important factor to my success is my will and determination to ride out all withdraw symptoms, knowing that it will get better. I only have to get through today, one minute at a time! Stick with it..you are bigger than this addiction. You don't have to allow it to have a hold on you anymore! Good luck.
  6. eagerquit
    eagerquit avatar
    382 posts
    Registered:
    07 Mar 2018
    13 Mar in reply to cls65
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    Hi,

    I too quit many times over the years and couldn't stay quit. My mind set was much like yours considering smokes to be "my best friend". I changed that opinion to "my killer" by taking a serious look at the poisons I was ingesting besides the obvious ones. I would never buy groceries that say they contain arsenic, formaldehyde, ammonia and butane to name a few and yet I was buying those things by the packs. Once I made that change of mindset, I was ready to quit for good. I have now been smoke free for six days using NRT tabs and gum to quiet the cravings. Those are now few so I am doing less NRT now.

    All the very best and hope you succeed as will I.

    Eagerquit
  7. shazzan
    shazzan avatar
    123 posts
    Registered:
    06 Nov 2018
    16 Nov in reply to darlenemel
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    Hi darlenemel

    I am sure we all feel (or felt) a little sadness at ending a long time relationship. Let's review what a friend isn't or doesn't do:

    A friend isn't constantly  working against your desire to  quit
    I friend doesn't give the illusion of giving help while the whole time sabotaging your efforts
    A friend doesn't get you hooked and literally choke you to death
    Your friend is a  controlling sneaky entity that alters your very brain making you believe that you need him to reduce your stress, increase your concentration while in fact the very opposite is true
    Our so called friend was the origin of our stress, cravings , slavery, and health problems
    Magically he alters the brain to think the cigarette tastes good when we know (and have known since the beginning when we started that it is awful tasting)
    This friend makes us lie bold faced to true friends and even to ourselves, that we enjoy smoking, that we can quit any time we want to , Then our friend goes om  to hook other souls who believe that we speak the truth or why would be smoke such a vile thing, pay good money for it and risk our lives?
    Your friend has made you into an addict... but you could never admit that to anyone... not even yourself
    The so called friend has made you delusional and controls you 
    And your friend is going to fight to stay on the top to do so

    I sincerely hope that you Win your Freedom back. It feels so good.
    Last modified on 17 Nov 2018 15:11 by Quit Coach 9
7 posts, 0 answered