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New member- first post. Quit date in 2 day.

22 posts, 4 answered
  1. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
    11 posts
    Registered:
    04 Feb 2019
    09 Feb
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    Hello, As the title says this is my first post and I will be quitting smoking this Monday, February 11, 2019. 

    Ive read through all the 4 Ds and have my support team in place. 

    However, I am scared that I won’t be able to handle the cravings. I have tried to quit a few times and even tried to cut down many time by trying to delay my time to walk to store, but the addiction seems to take over me and, before you know it, I am walking to the the store. I think maybe I should just walk past store and go home, but, again,something comes over me and I walk into to the store and buy my cigarettes. 

    I’m using Wellbutrin to help me quit. They say it takes 7-10 days to get a steady flow of the dopamine and some other stuff that will help me with the “cravings” Today is day 7 and just now, because I am talking about smoking, I “feel” like having a smoke. In fact, I am probably going to have a smoke.

    It’s funny, well funny to me, but since I set a quit date, instead of cutting back or smoking the usual amount, I am smoking MORE. I am literally somewhat consciously smoking more because I know I am quitting. I want to get in as many smokes as my lungs - I have developed a persistent cough - can handle. I have even resorted to eating something, even though I am not hungry, just so I can justify the extra smoking I have been doing. Yep, this is why I am so scared that I won’t be able to do it - it being quit this Monday in 2 day. 

    I have bery important reasons to quit, which are beyond the normal reasons. I have to quit. 

    Any help or support you would be willing to provide, would be greatly appreciated. 
  2. chesk
    chesk avatar
    23 posts
    Registered:
    28 Jan 2019
    09 Feb in reply to stargazer
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    Congrats and good Luck on Monday-

    I have quit for one week yesterday! The first 2 days were difficult - Just remember you need to put as much time as possible between you and your last cigarette.

    Think of it as quitting for one day and that’s all you need to get through
  3. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
    11 posts
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    04 Feb 2019
    09 Feb in reply to chesk
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    Thank you for replying. That is a great way of looking at it - one day at a time. 

    Feel free to reach out out to me if you need someone to talk to, as I imagine it is good to talk with someone who is going through the same experience. 
  4. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
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    09 Feb in reply to chesk
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    Sorry, I forgot to say congrats to you too. 1 week smoke free is awesome! 
  5. linda, quit coach
    linda, quit coach avatar
    146 posts
    Registered:
    28 Nov 2017
    09 Feb
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    Hi Stargazer,

    Welcome and congratulations for making this important decision to quit smoking! We are happy to have you here with us and we believe that you can succeed. You seem well prepared and motivated. You have a tool – the Wellbutrin, you have also set a quit date in two days and you have learned about the 4 D’s – that’s awesome!

    The process of quitting can be challenging, but if you don’t lose sight of your goal and you keep trying, you will surely reach your goal. As you said, the cravings can be hard to handle, but know that they don’t last as long as most people think they do. Sometimes, it might feel like forever, but it’s usually about 5 to 10 minutes. You can do this!

    There are different ways to distract yourself when you have a craving. Some people find helpful to have their hands busy with something: play on your phone, play games, play with a straw or a stress ball; brush your teeth; read a book; listen to music; watch a good movie; do a crossword puzzle or Sudoku; text a friend; do some cleaning, draw or paint something, exercise, go for a walk or do anything that you enjoy.

    Cravings can start at any time. When you think about smoking or want a cigarette, do everything you can to get out of that situation and go somewhere else or do something else. They don’t last very long. You can take control of your cravings!

    Stargazer, you have worked very hard to get to this point – Keep going strong! It’s quite normal to be a little bit scared before a quit – It’s a big lifestyle change where your routine and habits can be upside down and things can be tough sometimes. But, know that you are not alone in your quit journey, we are here for you. If you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to call us at 1-877-513-5333 and we’ll be happy to help you.

    Chesk, congratulations on your success getting through the first week - it's wonderful! Keep going strong and wishing you continued success!

    Thank you both for sharing your journey with us!
    Last modified on 09 Feb 2019 16:52 by linda, quit coach
  6. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
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    04 Feb 2019
    09 Feb in reply to linda, quit coach
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    Thank you, Iinda, quit coach. 

    Getting a message from you really helped me feel less scared of failure. 

    In fact, after reading your messsage, which was filled with great strategies, useful points of perspectives and real support, I feel confidence in myself to succeed. 

    Smokershelpline.ca has surpassed my expectations. I’m so happy that you exist. I, honestly, think that my chances of being able to quit are so 100% higher than if I had to do this on my own. 

    So, thank you to everyone who created this awesome organization and to all those who work the phone lines and to those who respond to messages on this forum.

    Here’s to me becoming smoke free!

    Stargazer
  7. nerak47
    nerak47 avatar
    48 posts
    Registered:
    23 Jan 2018
    10 Feb
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    Good day stargazer,

    Smoking is an addiction and quitting is going to be a little bumpy. In essence, we are quitting an addiction - and so, we need to replace the cigarettes with something else. And after 3 or 4 days, nicotine is out of our bodies, it becomes psychological not physical cravings... We battle our mind. 
    I also did Wellbutrin along with the patch and it was working... Oh boy did I drastically cut back. Stress was so bad for me though, I smoked through being sicker than a dog and then I gave up trying for cpl of weeks. 
    Champix and new quit date... Very much like you, the closer my date came the more I smoked! I felt anxious at the thought 'of never smoking again'..so breaking my day into chunks of time helped ease my mind. In the beginning I I could only do minutes at a time and sometimes, I when I felt stronger, and I could do an hr at a time. Soon enough I was counting days and it's been 369 days for me. 
    There are many way to distract... through it all, and remember ~ it's our mind that wants to smoke, and not our bodies. Cravings only last a few minutes, but although, sometimes they can feel like they last all day... that is our mind craving. For me personally, acknowledging I want a smoke help shorten craving. The more I denied wanting 1, the more I craved. But getting the "thought" out of my mind also helped. 
    Until you've found ways to help ease (1 way is keep posting and sharing) learning to live without smoking, have fun looking for ways that help. 
    1 minute, 1 hour, 1day @ a time... We've all been there. We can all help

    nerak 
  8. atp
    atp avatar
    362 posts
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    31 Dec 2018
    10 Feb in reply to stargazer
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    Most smokers have tried to quit several times, just goes to show how awful an addiction smoking is. This time I found that the big difference for me was being motivated (Amongst other reasons, I just wanted to quit and was tired of smoking). When you are ready and committed the whole process of quitting somehow becomes different.

    I was looking for the benefits of my quit, rather than focusing on the withdrawal feelings, etc. Read up on everything I could about quitting smoking, health benefits, etc. And I posted a lot on this site -  what a difference that made being able to express my experience of quitting and get helpful support and know there are others going through the same. 

    Finally, one piece of advice I kept coming across on this site - Not One Puff Ever. 

    On your quit day you become a non-smoker. Start thinking like one. Good Luck!
  9. atp
    atp avatar
    362 posts
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    31 Dec 2018
    10 Feb in reply to atp
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    I smoked a pack a day right up to my quit date (Midnight on new years eve). I quit, threw out all my smokes, lighters, etc. By about day 4 I was busy tossing out ashtrays, butt cans, spraying my garage and van with lysol, washing my jackets. Just needed to get rid of the remains of my smoking habit and remove the temptations. 

    After the first week I started to feel better having gone through the nicotine withdrawal. Then my motivation became - well I don't want to go through that again so, no, I am not going to smoke at all. 

  10. madeleine, quit coach
    madeleine, quit coach avatar
    33 posts
    Registered:
    12 Sep 2018
    Answered
    10 Feb
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    Hello everyone! 

    Just wanted to chime in and commend everyone on the amazing support on this thread! 
    Everyone's quit journeys are unique, and it's amazing reading everyone's personal successes and challenges that come with process. This thread covers great topics of motivations, thoughts, cravings, strategies, taking it one step at a time, and a resounding theme of support. 

    It's amazing what we can accomplish when we feel supported! 

    Keep up the great stuff! 

    Madeleine 
    Last modified on 10 Feb 2019 12:25 by madeleine, quit coach
  11. butterflyna
    butterflyna avatar
    125 posts
    Registered:
    15 Feb 2018
    Answered
    12 Feb
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    Hi Stargazer!
    I just wanted to welcome you to the site and obviously you have met some of the great people here. You will meet more, trust me. We are so blessed to have them. They have helped me when I had some issues and needed to not beat myself up. I have a second quit date now, March 1st. I have the mist and the patches and some help with my issue of anxiety over quitting. This is not my first time and I can so relate to your original post. Just take it one day/min at a time. Whatever you need to do. This site is so very helpful no matter where you are. Hope all is well and look forward to reading your next post. You got this! :)

    Butterflyna/Laurie
  12. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
    11 posts
    Registered:
    04 Feb 2019
    14 Feb in reply to nerak47
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    Thanks for sharing your experiences with me. 

    I did it. I quit on my quit date and have been smoke free for three days. Today is day four. 

    The hardest part is after I eat. 

    It’s funny because I had prepared cut up raw veggies for when I had a craving and instead of turning to unhealthy food, I had heard that having cut up celery and carrots would help. So, I had my craving, and wanted to eat, so I grabbed my veggies. Then, when I finished crunching my raw veggies, I felt the strong desire to have a cigarette  You know the after eating cigarette. Ack Then I thought, OMG, I am going to have to stop eating. LOL I actually cut back eating on my first two days. 

    The boredom cigarettes are hard craving for me too.In the evening, I used to watch a tv show episode and then go have a smoke. 

    Oh and stress. But I told myself, having a cigarette is not going to make my stress go away. In fact, if I smoked now, I’d feel anxiety, a little sick to my stomach and get a major head rush. Ha. So, that helped me. Kind of doing CBT on my reasons for craving a smoke. 

    I was wondering how long it took for the physical part of withdrawal took. I think you said 4 days? 

    That would be great, because, I have persistent pain from a bad neck injury I had four years ago. I was told that smoking makes pain worse. This was my main reason for quitting. But when day three came around, I had excruciating pain. My pain has been worse since yesterday. A doctor told me that this is because my body is going through withdrawal, and that it will pass. 

    Id really like to know how much longer this increase of intense pain is going to last. 

    Congrats on your smoking cessation time. WOW, you inspire me to take it one day, one hour and sometimes one minute, especially after a meal, at a time. 

    Thanks again for your reply. 
  13. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
    11 posts
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    04 Feb 2019
    14 Feb in reply to atp
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    Congrats on being smoke free for 1.5 months. 

    I love your your idea of throwing out reminders. And I really like what you said about after one week it got easier for you.  

    I am on day 4 of being smoke free. Whoohoo And it’s funny that you said how you look back and think you do t want to go through that again. I’m feeling the same way now. I keep thinking, don’t slip because then you will have to go through this withdrawal all over again staring at day 1. 

    May we both stay smoke smoke free and enjoy the great benefits of being smoke free. 
  14. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
    11 posts
    Registered:
    04 Feb 2019
    14 Feb in reply to madeleine, quit coach
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    Thanks, Madeleine. 

    I just came back on today. Surprisingly, I found that I had set up all these support people to reach out to, but when it came to day 1, I needed to be alone. I didn’t want to talk about it. I don’t want to hear about the 4ds. I didn’t even want to text the word cigarette, because it made me think about smoking. I made it through to day 4, and thought, I should come on here to see if anyone sent me a message. 

    Me I think it’s because I am more of an introvert?? 

    I left a reply to butterflyna where I talked about being a person who has been dealing with persistent pain for 4 years. I had a very bad accident 4 years ago and broke my neck in three different places. I’m so lucky to be alive and to walk. I didn’t smoke for a full year after my surgery because the surgeon said that smoking dramatically decreases your bodies ability to heal anything to do with your bones and vertebrae. But as soon as I knew the year had past, I started smoking. I later found out that smoking increases your pain levels. So, I knew I had to quit, and because I had already tried to quit on my own and couldn’t, this time around, I talked to my dr about going on Wellbutrin (Buproprion) and I registered to the smokershelpline.ca and this forum. I wanted to make sure I was prepared to succeed this time around. Back to my point. Haha. Have you heard about people with persistent pain quitting for lowing their pain levels, and only to discover that on day 3, my pain has increased. I’m hoping my dr is right by saying that the reason my pain is worse righ now is because my body is going through withdrawal, but it will pass. 

    Just wondering if you could offer me some information about pain and smoking and pain increasing while going through withdrawal?? Or you could ask around and get back to me. 

    Id just love to know how long withdrawal takes because the pain is really bad and constant right now. 

    Thanks for replying to those those who responded to my message while I was going through my first three days and needed to hide out. 

    Thanks everyone for your responses. They really help me feel confident and encouraged to stay smoke free. 

    Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!!! 
  15. atp
    atp avatar
    362 posts
    Registered:
    31 Dec 2018
    Answered
    14 Feb in reply to stargazer
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    Stargazer,

    Congrats on getting to day 4 of being a non-smoker!

    The pain I had about 3 or 4 days in... Headaches, chest tightness, coughing. I was so down because i was thinking I was getting sick on top of quitting. Nah, it was my body going through 'pack a day for 30 years' withdrawal. Some aspirin helped. By about day 4/5 the worst had past and after that it was a steady improvement each day for the next week or so, although I was going to bed around 8:30 each night - totally wiped out physically. Amazing how your body takes over and starts to heal itself. 

    Here's to another smoke free day!

  16. atp
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    14 Feb in reply to atp
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    Oh yeah - and drink lots and lots of water!
  17. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
    799 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
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    14 Feb
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    Hi stargazer,

    Congratulations for being smoke free for four days!  That is wonderful!

    I had to laugh when you said that food was a major trigger and you were trying not to eat.  I did the exact same thing!  I was literally afraid to eat, because I knew it would set off my cravings big time.  But you can't avoid eating, so you just have to tough it out.  It will get easier as your body adjusts to not being bombarded by all those chemicals.

    You are doing so well, stargazer.  Keep up the good work!  I am rooting for you!
  18. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
    11 posts
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    04 Feb 2019
    16 Feb in reply to atp
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    Hi atp,

    Thank you so much for messaging me when I first left a message. I apologize for not getting back to you during my first three days of quitting. I wrote this to the support coach reply’s, and I just realized that you may not have read why I didn’t respond right away - why it took me three days to respond. I had thought I would need all this support, and I had three friends on standby to call, in addition to this forum and the hotline. However, when I first stopped smoking, the desire to smoke was sooo strong that I didn’t even want to talk to anyone. I didn’t even answer the call from this agency that I had set up. It wasn’t until day 4 that I could talk about smoking, quitting, cigarettes, the 4ds, etc. I forgot to mention this in my last response to you. Sorry about that. I am so appreciative of you and others taking the time out of your day to help people like me. I’m on day 6, Whoohoo. My pain has come back to almost where it was before. Thank you so much for sharing your own experiences, great tips and your support. It really does solidify my courage to stay smoke free. 

    Have a a great weekend! 
    Stargazer 😊
  19. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
    11 posts
    Registered:
    04 Feb 2019
    16 Feb in reply to butterflyna
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    Hi butterflyna,

    first off, my apologies for my late reply. I had thought that I had responded to you very relatable and supportive message to me. Also, thank you for welcoming to this forum. 

    I am on day 5. Yay!!! 

    The first three days were the hardest. I had set up all these supports, and thought I would be calling the hotline, my three support people and reach out for help on this forum. However, to my surprise, I needed to hide out from everyone. I thought if I heard anyone trying to help me, it would make me go to the store to buy a pack. In fact, I had a phone conversation with my bestest friend, who happens to be a smoker (she used Wellbutrin and it helped her quit, but she started smoking two years after quitting), anyways she instigated an argument with me, I diplomatically got out of the intense conversation, even though I knew I did nothing wrong, but, I chose to let her be right rather than me pointing out her flaws. Haha 
    Well after that conversation, I wanted to go to the store and by a pack. I had planned to do it as soon as I felt rested up (I had been out for a long time and because of my neck injury, I was exhausted when I got home). I told myself, I don’t care won’t people say or think about me not being able to quit. I didn’t want to feel bad about my plan to go buy cigarettes. Well, time past and the urge decreased. It was so hard that day. I was surprised that I didn’t go get smokes. The next day, there was a snowstorm. Schools closed down and the wind was sooo bad that my doctor called and told me not to come in, because she was worried about me slipping and falling. Mother Nature to the rescue. There were moments during that day that I wanted to smoke sooo bad. My best friend instigated another argument with me. I thought, oh my gosh, does she not know I am vulnerable right now. I, honestly, don’t know how I made it through those first three days. Then, because I have persistent pain, my pain increased on day 3 and 4. Well it was really day 2 1/2 and day 3 1/2. To be honest, I let myself have two last cigarettes when I woke up on day 1. And later, can’t remember the time, after I chomped on raw veggies, I had a bad urge to smoke. The after eating smoke was a smoke that Is still hard for me not to smoke. The only thing that stops me now is because I do not want to go through the past five days again. 

    Anyways, sorry if I went on too much. I just wanted to share my story with you, because our experiences of trying to quit are similar. I want to wish you good luck on your next quit date. And I want you to know that you can reach out to me for support anytime. You can send me a message on a different thread or use this thread. I’m here for you, just as you were there for me. Your story helped me feel better about myself and helped me feel stronger in my conviction to stay smoke free. 

    Here’s to the bothe of us, being smoke free by mid March and beyond. 

    Stargazer 😊
  20. stargazer
    stargazer avatar
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    04 Feb 2019
    16 Feb in reply to treepeo
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    Hi Treepeo, 

    Thank you for messaging me. Your message made me smile, because you too shared the experience of not wanting to eat because it triggered the desire to smoke. Ha. Congrats to you too. I’m happy to say that I am still smoke free and I am on day 6 now. Whoohoo I lost a pound or two. Hahaha But, rest assure m, I started eating more often by day 3 or 4. The “desire” to have a cigarette after I eat is still here. What stops me from going to the store and buying a pack of smokes is the thought of having to go through those first 5 days again. They were soo hard. I honestly think the Wellbutrin helped me. I have an anxiety disorder and take medication for it. The person I see for this was very hesitant to prescribe Wellbutrin because it would, and did, increase my anxiety. However, she prescribed me clonazepam to help with the anxiety I ended up feeling. For me, the anxiety dissipated. I only feel it a few hours after I take Wellbutrin. Night time is hard, and I am sure that is because the Wellbutrin has worn off by 50%, I think. I don’t take the second dose is Wellbutrin as some people who use Wellbutrin for smoking cessation are recommended to take. This is because I know I would not sleep and have extreme anxiety. 

    There are a few medication for smoking cessation and sometimes it trial and error before you find the one that works for you. I know this because it took many different medications trials to find one that would work for my anxiety. Keep me posted on your journey. Thanks again for sharing your story with me and your kind, supportive word. They help me a lot. 

    Hope you are having a great weekend. 

    Stargazer 😊
  21. efram, quit coach
    efram, quit coach avatar
    139 posts
    Registered:
    29 Nov 2017
    17 Feb in reply to stargazer
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    Stargazer,

    Congratulations on your progress!

    The fact that you're again able to talk about quitting is a good sign, right? That means that the desire to smoke isn't as strong as it was during the first three days! It's also great to hear that your pain level has decreased from a few days ago.

    Thanks for the helpful tip on finding a medication that works for you. It is trial and error, meaning that one may have to keep trying until they find a good fit (sometimes people get lucky and find something that works on the first try -- and sometimes people do just fine quitting without using anything).

    I'm glad you have support in place from the person who you see for your anxiety disorder as well. We know that there can be some increased withdrawal symptoms in smokers with mental health conditions, so it's definitely a plus to have that professional support in place.  

    I'm glad that Mother Nature has been on your side as well. You're definitely well-supported!

    Add to this what you said in your first post, that you have very important reasons to quit, and so your motivation, above all, is keeping you strong and moving forward!

    Thanks for keeping us posted,
    Efram
  22. wandam
    wandam avatar
    93 posts
    Registered:
    05 Feb 2019
    17 Feb in reply to nerak47
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    Love your words of support & encouragement. It’s been a little over 2 months since I quit & as hard as it sometimes is, I’m determined to hang in there one day at a time.πŸ˜€
22 posts, 4 answered