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Skeptical

9 posts, 0 answered
  1. leebeau
    leebeau  avatar
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    29 Dec 2017
    29 Dec 2017
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    Hi Gang
         Approximately 2 months ago, I got a terrible cold. You know that feeling; headache, body ache, congestion, and coughing.  Well the cold seemed to go away but the cough didn’t. I went to my doctor.  She gave me a prescription for a cough syrup. I had to fax her a week later to get more because I still had the cough. She ended up giving it to me and told me if it doesn’t suppress, she would send me for copd tests.  The cough wasn’t dry after a couple weeks. It felt like it was deep in my chest and had keep coughing short coughs to get the mucous up.  My biggest fear is, I know that the test my doctor wants me to take won’t be good.  Another fear I have is failure to quit.  I have no will power and can honestly tell as of now, I don’t want to quit but I know I have to. To me wanting to do something and having to do something is two separate issues. Any feedback gang?
    Thank you for letting spill my guts lol
    Last modified on 29 Dec 2017 01:12 by leebeau
  2. turningpoint
    turningpoint avatar
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    29 Dec 2017
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    Hi there,
    I had the almost identical situation.  Got a cold which quickly cleared up, but the cough and mucus continued for weeks.  However, I delayed going to the doctor and quit smoking instead.  Within a very few days the cough and mucus disappeared completely.  So I conclude that not smoking does indeed work.
    Best of luck with your situation and with your quit.

    turningpoint
  3. treepeo
    treepeo avatar
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    29 Dec 2017
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    Hi Leebeau,

    You are absolutely right.  Wanting to do something and having to do something are two different things.  And it definitely makes a difference in how we handle things.  For example, someone I know got cancer and felt she had to quit smoking, so she did.  But once she beat the cancer, she started smoking again.  She told me she never wanted to quit, but felt she had to quit.  Fast forward a couple of years, and now she has quit again, but this time, it is because she wanted to quit.

    Having said that, think about why you don't want to quit.  You say you have no willpower.  So is it because you are afraid you won't be able to do it?  Are you worried about withdrawal symptoms?  Are you scared of going outside your comfort zone?  

    I know that I had all sorts of reasons for why I told myself I didn't want to quit.  But really, what it boiled down to was that I was addicted and I was afraid of going through withdrawal.  And I will be honest, it wasn't fun.  But it was doable, and I did it.  And it was the best decision I have ever made. 

    We are lucky these days, because there are various NRTs available which many people have found extremely helpful.  There is also this site, which provides really good info on how to go about quitting.  And of course, there is this forum for additional help and support.

    Give it some serious thought, Leebeau.  Ultimately the decision is yours to make.
  4. valerie, quit coach
    valerie, quit coach avatar
    46 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    29 Dec 2017
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    Hello Leebeau,

    Both Turningpoint and Treepeo brought up some good points. Everyone's reason to quit smoking is different. Take the time to look at what your reasons are to continue to smoke and what your reasons are to quit smoking. 

    If you want read through the One Step at a Time booklets. You can start by reading "For Smokers Who Don't Want to Quit" and take some time to write down your pros and cons. 

    Here is the link to the booklet: https://smokershelpline.ca/docs/default-source/default-document-library/pdf/osaat-who_dont_want_to_quit_en_nov2014.pdf?sfvrsn=74f7d3f1_0

    If you have any questions don't hesitate to contact a Quit Coach at Smokers' Helpline (877-513-5333) or ask the members here. 

    Have a nice day,
    Valerie
  5. brieffree
    brieffree avatar
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    28 Nov 2017
    30 Dec 2017
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    Dear Leebeau

    I think you are experience almost the same as I had 2 and a 1/2 tears ago. I went to the Doctor and He told me that I had 30 percent of Lung Capacity Damage from smoking, that was why I was Coifing like crazy. 

    Since then I was Desperate, I felt between the Death and live! So I had to make an internal Decision, start a new way of Life as a Non Smoker

    That moment was a big change as an Adult! I use to smoke 3 pack's a day!
    Quit as cold turkey!

    Of course is not easy but Now I can tell you I am Not Coifing anymore, I smell Great! My food test better and I fell like stranger than before!

    That means Please quit! Do not be afraid! Trust me, if I did anyone can!

    All you need to do is just quit!

    Welcome to a new life free of smoke!
  6. chris644
    chris644 avatar
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    02 Jan 2018
    02 Jan in reply to leebeau
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    Lee beau;
    Its my opinion that you do want to quit but you're afraid of going through the process of quitting.  If you could turn back time to the moment you picked up your first cigarette, would you still smoke it?  I think, if every smoker could turn back time to that moment before they took their first puff, knowing everything they know now, they wouldn't do it.  Let's face it, it's the process of quitting smoking.  It's going to be hard, it's going to take a lot of effort on your part and you are going to go through withdrawal but...it is something that you can handle.  All you need to do is first prepare yourself, believe in yourself and then go through the steps.  The only question is, how much do you want to quit?  Write down everything that you like about smoking, then write down everything you hate about it.  Read it back to yourself
  7. leebeau
    leebeau  avatar
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    02 Jan
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    Thank you all for your words of encouragement . Another concern I have is my co-workers and my family. My fear is my withdrawals make me very bitchy ( pardon my French) . I'm concerned about lashing  out at my co-workers and family. I care very much for these people but I'm thinking realistically here. I know myself. I know when the withdrawals start, I'm going to take it out on these people. I know it sounds like excuses but in fact, im telling you this because I need help preventing these worrisome senarios I'm telling you about.  These people are only human.  They can only take so much of my moodiness , before they get fed up with me.
    Any thoughts?
  8. efram, quit coach
    efram, quit coach avatar
    46 posts
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    29 Nov 2017
    08 Jan in reply to leebeau
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    Hi leebeau,

    It's nice to see the encouragement you're getting here!

    Looks like you may still be waiting for some thoughts about how to navigate the withdrawals part of quitting, though.

    As Treepeo mentioned briefly earlier in the thread, there are many NRT options these days that, with proper dosage and proper use, do a fine job in lessening withdrawals. Some people use a few different types of NRT at the same time and find even greater benefit.

    Others prefer to go the prescription medication route: Zyban and Champix are the most commonly used medications and can also lessen withdrawals. It could help to discuss quit aids further with your friendly neighborhood pharmacist, RN, or doctor.

    I'd also guess that your co-workers and family care for you just as much as you care for them. It may also help to openly discuss your concerns with them ahead of time. Let them know that you may be moody for a while, why you may be moody, and how they can help. The "Help A Smoker Quit" booklet available as a PDF here on SHL.ca could help to get that conversation started!

    Hope this helps,
    Efram


    Last modified on 08 Jan 2018 01:01 by efram, quit coach
  9. treepeo
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    08 Jan
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    Hi leebeau,

    To my mind, going through withdrawal never gives someone the right to be mean to other people.  Treating others poorly is simply unacceptable.  Just tell yourself in advance that you will handle your quit with grace.  And do consider using some kind of NRT, which will help you to cope with your cravings.
9 posts, 0 answered